Dialect in British Fiction: 1800-1836Funded by The Arts and Humanities Research CouncilSupported by The University of Sheffield
Full record including Speech Extracts
Cunningham, AllanLord Roldan. A Romance.
Author Details
Surname:Cunningham
First Names:Allan
Gender:Male
Anonymous:No
Publication Details
Publisher:John Macrone, St. James's Square
Place:London
Date:1836
Novel Details
Genre:Bildungsroman; biography; courtship; didactic/moralising; domestic; inheritance/identity; supernatural
Setting:Glengarock, Scotland
Period:Contemporary
Plot
In a nutshell: this is a sprawling but readable novel. At its heart is a very sympathetic portrait of a group of Scots peasantry, but there are also prophecies and some meetings with famous characters. It has a happy ending.
Mary Morison comes to church to sit on the repentance stool or "Creepie" after her seduction by young Lord Roldan. Then Lord Roldan himself turns up to remonstrate with the pastor in a hotheaded way. The pastor tells him he should marry Mary, but he finds her beneath him socially.
Jean Rabson goes to see Mary in her 'Elfin Glen' home formed from natural rocks. There the baby is born with some supernatural/Catholic assistance from Nanse Halberson, and he is named Morison Roland. Lord Roldan shows up to offer a purse, but Jean turns him away. Lady Roldan, the Earl's mother, visits Mary in quite a stormy scene. Mary brings up her son successfully and sends him away to school with the passionate Dominie Milligan. Morison is quick and clever but given to mischief. He encounters his father while raiding a hawk's nest. His father follows him home, and offers to marry Mary but she refuses him because he has broken so many vows before, and her son supports her. She threatens Lord Roldan with a pistol and he leaves [and what a relief all of this is after all the earlier novels where women forgive and marry the men who have harmed them].
Morison attends a dance, also attended by Lady Roldan with a beautiful young woman, Rose. The similarity between Morison and Rose Roldan is widely commented upon, and Morison is very struck with Rose, who is rumoured to be his half-sister. Mattie, a local heiress, considers marrying Morison when she believes that he will be the Rabson's heir, but is then very rude about him when she understands that he is not the heir. This makes Morison aware of the shame of his birth. Morison goes to his father and demands that he marries his mother, but his father refuses.
Blynders and Braunks arrive to make improvements to Glengarnock. They overhear Mary singing the song of her own life (vol 1, 195) and make critical commentary upon her 'vulgar' song. Heddles, Treddles, Warp, Waft, and company set up a mill in Glengarnock, much to the dismay of many local residents.
Lord Roldan nearly marries Lady Vane, but the villagers show up in Mary Morison's defence, and Lady Vane is much struck with Mary and refuses to marry the man who betrayed her, alluding to the levelling that is taking place as a result of the French Revolution [again, this is an unexpected plot twist- Lady Vane starts out looking like a typical villain]. Lord Roldan arranges for Morison to be carried away on a ship to the West Indies. Morison participates in the revolt of the Isle of Hispaniola (Haiti, 1791) and befriends a Frenchman who brings him back to France. There Morison wins much acclaim fighting against the Prussians, and also meets Robespierre, Danton and Thomas Paine.
Back home, his mother has become richer thanks to her son. Once more Lord Roldan turns up and wishes to marry her - he claims indeed that they were married and he just needs to recover the crucial bit of paper. Once more she sees him off the premises. Morison meets Robert Burns, and Burns declares him to be a kindred spirit.
Morison goes off to fight with the French again, and meets up with Napoleon [vol 3 p.77 Napoleon quotes Ossian]. While fighting in Italy he meets with the papal ambassador, who turns out to be Lord Roldan. Father and son are very formal with one another. Napoleon claims Roldan as a kindred spirit [vol 3, p. 103]. Roldan rescues Rose from attackers, but disagrees with her about the French Revolution. They meet Josephine. Rose goes home to Scotland, Roland fights for Napoleon in Egypt and meets the Lily of the Desert, who has the gift of prophecy.
Eventually he loses faith in Napoleon's project, and returns home. There his father meets with Dick Corsbane, whom he has entrusted to recover the marriage document from Egypt. Dick and Lord Roland fight, and Lord Roland is slain. While dying he reconciles with Mary and acknowledges his son. After his death, an old servant brings forth the long-lost document which proves the original marriage legal. Mary takes her place as Lady Roldan, but dies shortly afterwards. Morison loves Rose but is not sure whether she his is sister. He summons the Lily of the Desert who reveals herself to be Rose's mother, her father was Thomas, Lord Roldan's brother. Morison and Rose marry, Morison finally and symbolically commits himself to peace.
Overview of the Dialect
Very extensive use of Scots in the dialogue, but very little metalanguage. Note, however, that there's a lot of critical reading in this novel - the 3 women read the novels critically, Blynders and Braunks read Mary's songs. It is also notable for the way in which the hero encounters various historical figures, including Robert Burns, although Burns is not actually all that dialectal. Overall, dialect seems to be used to create a dense network of local Glengarnock characters, and these show some interesting code-switching. The novel does not explicitly concern itself with language variety, however.
Displaying 7 characters from this novel    |    Highlight dialect features in each extract    |    Do not highlight dialect features in each extract
Speaker #1:Nickie Neevie - Peasant woman
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Nickie Neevie
Gender:Female
Age:Adult - middle aged
Narrative Voice:3rd person
Role:Significant

Social Role
Social Role Description:Peasant woman
Social Role Category:Respectable poor
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast of Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
" It's a fine thing," cried Nickie Neevison, whose tongue was ever in the van -- " it's a fine thing, I say, to be weel -favoured. Madam there, where she takes the road before us, may thank her curling locks and bright een for the escape she made: my certie ! the minster advertised her talents and looks: he was harder on us decent and faultless folk, for a feather by ordinary in our head and a flouce more than common in our gown, than he was on madam for doing what he would na name, poor bird-mouthed body , as if we didnae all know what he meant. Such gentleness is a premium to folly: I'll answer for naebody after this."
A milder voice took up the subject. — "We must consider," said Jeanie Rabson, that beauty is a temptation, and speak mildly of the errors of loveliness. See how busy the bees and wasps are about this new-blossomed and scented flower, while not one of them will touch that common weed"
" Ye speak touchingly, my dear sister," said James Rabson, the laird of Howeboddom ; "and when did ye speak otherwise? But will none of you accompany yonder unhappy thing hame ? -- she has dreed a terrible weird this day, and may need in her lonesome home some who can both think and speak."
"And act too, laird ," said Nickie Neevison. "But 'las anee ! I cannot go: I lack experience in her needs, ye ken ; but she can get Marion Johnstone, a sure hand -- mony's the ill-faured face which she has introduced to daylight; and, better still, there's Girzie Haffie, whom folk call Nipneck -- she nippit the neck of Sarah Steenson's bairn -- and what she did ance she may do again. But what mad rider's this! -- if here is nae the young lord himself! If he has heard of what I said of him to-day, he'll never stop his horse and talk wi' me as I come hame frae the market again."
(Vol. 1,p. 24-25)
Speakers: All , Nickie Neevie
"But waur nor a' " -- thus Nickie concluded her version of the story -- "when the young lord -- there's something gude in all of the name of Roldan -- found that glamour prevailed, he had eneugh of Christian strength left to drop a purse of gowd -- mair nor the carlin could weel lift -- at her feet; and then as grace wad have it, his horse bore him away frae peril. And what d'ye think she did wi' it? Laid it by for the creature and the guiltless wean ? Na , troth atweel no: she flung it right into the raging torrent, and bade the devil dive for it if he wanted it; and that's as true as I am here."
(Vol. 1,p. 59)
Speakers: All , Nickie Neevie
"Fool bodie !" said Nickie, " that's no the weird and the mister of the matter. Wha shall break the sad tidings to Mary Morison? wha shall tell her that her ae bairn her only joy and deary , is awa to the land of the plague and the pestilence? Wha shall tell her but me, and O, I'11 do't cannily . Mary, I'll say, dinna be alarmed; for though the sea is rough and deep, and the sand of Egypt like melted lead, and the wind comes with neither rain nor dew on its wings, but bearing blight and famine; and though the swords of the enemy are sharp and their shot poisoned, and there's nae food but paddockstools , and nae drink but camel water, yet, Mary, the Lord is strong,and can work miracles as weel now as of old, and though Morison is in kittle company, ye canna tell where a blister may light. There now! I think I can manage the matter discreetly." And Nickie looked right and left for approbation.
(Vol. 3,p. 148)
" Ye are all wrong here, Jeanie; ye have been saving money, and sawing corn, and shearing sheep, contrary to all true principles; your gain is not true gain. I am sorry to say so; but Mr. Braunks and Mr. Blynders, here, are of my opinion."
"Then Mr. Braunks is but a gowk , and Mr Blynders is nae better," said Nickie Neevison. " It's easier to tell them than to send them word."
"We are happy," said Jeanie, "and have nae wish to be better. We have won siller , and we strive to keep it. We open our doors to the poor and the needy, and they eat and drink, and go on their way; and we sow our corn and reap it, and rear our sheep and shear them, and we often praise God that he winna permit the earth to be forced into fruit, save in the season, else man would be enslaved like an ox in a mill, and have nae time to wipe his brow and sing His praise."
"Such is the language we are ever doomed to hear," said Braunks.
(Vol. 1,p. 185)
Speaker #2:Jeanie Rabson - Sister to the laird
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Jeanie
Gender:Female
Age:Adult - young
Narrative Voice:3rd person
Role:Significant

Social Role
Social Role Description:Sister to the laird
Social Role Category:Yeoman
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast of Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
" It's a fine thing," cried Nickie Neevison, whose tongue was ever in the van -- " it's a fine thing, I say, to be weel -favoured. Madam there, where she takes the road before us, may thank her curling locks and bright een for the escape she made: my certie ! the minster advertised her talents and looks: he was harder on us decent and faultless folk, for a feather by ordinary in our head and a flouce more than common in our gown, than he was on madam for doing what he would na name, poor bird-mouthed body , as if we didnae all know what he meant. Such gentleness is a premium to folly: I'll answer for naebody after this."
A milder voice took up the subject. — "We must consider," said Jeanie Rabson, that beauty is a temptation, and speak mildly of the errors of loveliness. See how busy the bees and wasps are about this new-blossomed and scented flower, while not one of them will touch that common weed"
" Ye speak touchingly, my dear sister," said James Rabson, the laird of Howeboddom ; "and when did ye speak otherwise? But will none of you accompany yonder unhappy thing hame ? -- she has dreed a terrible weird this day, and may need in her lonesome home some who can both think and speak."
"And act too, laird ," said Nickie Neevison. "But 'las anee ! I cannot go: I lack experience in her needs, ye ken ; but she can get Marion Johnstone, a sure hand -- mony's the ill-faured face which she has introduced to daylight; and, better still, there's Girzie Haffie, whom folk call Nipneck -- she nippit the neck of Sarah Steenson's bairn -- and what she did ance she may do again. But what mad rider's this! -- if here is nae the young lord himself! If he has heard of what I said of him to-day, he'll never stop his horse and talk wi' me as I come hame frae the market again."
(Vol. 1,p. 24-25)
" Dinna ," said Jeanie Rabson, "lay yere cheek to mine Dominie -- daft bodie , I am no bonnie Mattie Anderson, nor are ye Morison Roldan."
" Aweel ," said the Dominie, sitting more perpendicular, "I concur in the motion of sending the young man to college. By the time the sickle is next among the corn, he will be put as far as my humble knowledge can put him, and then he maun go to the city of Edinburgh, and drink at the classic wells of that noble place; look out for some earl's son, who desires to learn his lesson through another men's capacities, and if he is judicious, and disna fa' in love with ane of his noble scholar's sisters, he may be ablins presented to a kirk , and the dreams of his mother realized."
"And how is he to be provided for at the college, Dominie?" said Jeanie; "how mickle siller will it take, and aboon a' will it no be a risk? -- He's young and he's handsome, with a wild ee , and wit at will; and then they say that the bonniest lasses in the wild world are to be seen in Enbrugh . -- I doubt him, Dominie, I doubt him."
(Vol. 1,p. 154)
" Ye are all wrong here, Jeanie; ye have been saving money, and sawing corn, and shearing sheep, contrary to all true principles; your gain is not true gain. I am sorry to say so; but Mr. Braunks and Mr. Blynders, here, are of my opinion."
"Then Mr. Braunks is but a gowk , and Mr Blynders is nae better," said Nickie Neevison. " It's easier to tell them than to send them word."
"We are happy," said Jeanie, "and have nae wish to be better. We have won siller , and we strive to keep it. We open our doors to the poor and the needy, and they eat and drink, and go on their way; and we sow our corn and reap it, and rear our sheep and shear them, and we often praise God that he winna permit the earth to be forced into fruit, save in the season, else man would be enslaved like an ox in a mill, and have nae time to wipe his brow and sing His praise."
"Such is the language we are ever doomed to hear," said Braunks.
(Vol. 1,p. 185)
" Now , Maister John," said Jeanie, "I see ye scarcely ken that boy; it's Morison Roldan; I love him like a drap of my ain blude , and he's the son of mickle sorrow, and I maun say't shame, for his mither was, aye , and is, bonnie Mary Morison, and his father -- I winna gie him the name he deserves but the ane he gets, Lord Roldan."
" Aye , a papist, and a malignant," said the Dominie, "a wicked witty man, and of a bold race, and bloody."
" Weel then," said Jeanie, " there's the greater need to mind this boy, for he is a Roldan every inch of him. Now ye maun keep the boys frae nicknaming him, first for his ain sake, and secondly, for theirs, for he's like a flaff of fire and thunder at the back on't , I trow he'll sort them; there'll be bloody noses amang them as sure as ye are John Milligan, and I am Jean Rabson."
(Vol. 1,p. 108)
"Mother," said Morison, returning her caress, "wherever I moved, and whatever I did, you were present: a thousand and a thousand times have I recalled your tenderness, and a thousand times lived over again the blessed hours which we have spent solitary together, in this little chamber; and, O! many a time have I recalled your affectionate predictions of the eminence I should reach but little did ye dream it was to be by the sword."
" 'Deed that's true, my bairn ," said Mary, "but the will of God maun be obeyed. The violence which reft thee from thy native land, in a great measure shaped thy calling and turned thee to this course of blood -- but ye will bide with me now, my bairn ; there are many ways to fame in thy ain land, for O, I like ill that ye are a blood-spiller, and warse , that ye are striving heart and hand wi' thae wearyfou French."
" Wi' the French, gude guide us!" exclaimed Jeanie Rabson, "is that true, Morison, and whether are ye fighting for us or against us ?"
(Vol. 3,p. 2)
Speaker #3:Mary Morison - Peasant woman
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Mary Morison
Gender:Female
Age:Adult - young
Narrative Voice:3rd person
Role:Central

Social Role
Social Role Description:Peasant woman
Social Role Category:Respectable poor
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast of Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
"Mother," said Morison, hanging around her neck, " I'll never leave you."
"O yes my boy, ye maun leave me; it will be for your ain good. Ye maun learn the wisdom which is contained in books; ye maun become learned in the language in which God conversed with his chosen people, and in which Christ announced the salvation of believers; otherwise ye will not be able to preach the word wisely."
"But mother," he said, "I dinna want to be a minister; I wad rather gang and push my fortune, as men did lang syne , that I may win gold and jewels wi' a sword in my hand, and gie them to you when I hae done."
(Vol. 1,p. 94-95)
"Mother," said Morison, returning her caress, "wherever I moved, and whatever I did, you were present: a thousand and a thousand times have I recalled your tenderness, and a thousand times lived over again the blessed hours which we have spent solitary together, in this little chamber; and, O! many a time have I recalled your affectionate predictions of the eminence I should reach but little did ye dream it was to be by the sword."
" 'Deed that's true, my bairn ," said Mary, "but the will of God maun be obeyed. The violence which reft thee from thy native land, in a great measure shaped thy calling and turned thee to this course of blood -- but ye will bide with me now, my bairn ; there are many ways to fame in thy ain land, for O, I like ill that ye are a blood-spiller, and warse , that ye are striving heart and hand wi' thae wearyfou French."
" Wi' the French, gude guide us!" exclaimed Jeanie Rabson, "is that true, Morison, and whether are ye fighting for us or against us ?"
(Vol. 3,p. 2)
"I kenned it wad be this way," said Nanse. "They have baith come together, and I like it all the better. Mary my doo ! Mary Morison! it's a' safely ower ; -- it's a braw boy- bairn ."
"Is it world like?" murmured a low voice, "for oh, it has come in sorrow!"
" Warld like!" exclaimed Nanse, " wha ever saw ane of the race that was na warld like? The Roldans are the handsomest forms in all the south countree ."
A slight flush was visible on the mother's face at these words; she clasped her hands and holding them above her, looked up and prayed -- prayed for the fourth person of this little lonesome community.
" ye maun take another mouthful of the blessed cordial," said Nanse, " Na , nae naysays: the noble grandmother of this bonnie boy -- a bonnie boy he is, I can tell ye -- drank the selfsame draught out of the samen cup, when she was made lighter of Lord Roldan. Now, compose yersel ; I have had tenderer gear to handle than ye > are, weel I wot ; ye will do well enough."
(Vol. 1,p. 50-51)
Speaker #4:Nanse Halberson - Peasant and witch
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Nanse Halberson
Gender:Female
Age:Adult - elderly
Narrative Voice:3rd person
Role:Significant

Social Role
Social Role Description:Peasant and witch
Social Role Category:Respectable poor
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast of Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
Speakers: All , Nanse Halberson
"There!" said Nanse, as she returned from depositing the iron crook and tongs on the outside of the house -- " there's the forerunner; and it will be a gaye and stiff storm, if that be a true sample. Mary, my doo , ye had better streek yersel down, and try and get a blink of sleep; but first take a cupful of my cordial, and eat a bit of my cake, ye will feel the benefit of them baith ." So saying, Nanse prepared a beverage resembling tea, which she poured into the little cup we have already noticed; to this she added sugar and cream, and taking with her one of the small round cakes, went to the bedside, and whispered, "Mary Morison, listen to me. D'ye understand these tokens in earth and air? They are intimations that a son is to be born of the Roldan blood. I ken the thing weel ; and so it has ever happened since their castle stood in Glengarnock, and that's an auld tale."
(Vol. 1,p. 46)
"I kenned it wad be this way," said Nanse. "They have baith come together, and I like it all the better. Mary my doo ! Mary Morison! it's a' safely ower ; -- it's a braw boy- bairn ."
"Is it world like?" murmured a low voice, "for oh, it has come in sorrow!"
" Warld like!" exclaimed Nanse, " wha ever saw ane of the race that was na warld like? The Roldans are the handsomest forms in all the south countree ."
A slight flush was visible on the mother's face at these words; she clasped her hands and holding them above her, looked up and prayed -- prayed for the fourth person of this little lonesome community.
" ye maun take another mouthful of the blessed cordial," said Nanse, " Na , nae naysays: the noble grandmother of this bonnie boy -- a bonnie boy he is, I can tell ye -- drank the selfsame draught out of the samen cup, when she was made lighter of Lord Roldan. Now, compose yersel ; I have had tenderer gear to handle than ye > are, weel I wot ; ye will do well enough."
(Vol. 1,p. 50-51)
Speaker #5:Morison Roldan - Peasant, later turned Lord
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Morison
Gender:Male
Age:Youth
Narrative Voice:3rd person
Role:Central

Social Role
Social Role Description:Peasant, later turned Lord
Social Role Category:Respectable poor
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast of Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
"Mother," said Morison, hanging around her neck, " I'll never leave you."
"O yes my boy, ye maun leave me; it will be for your ain good. Ye maun learn the wisdom which is contained in books; ye maun become learned in the language in which God conversed with his chosen people, and in which Christ announced the salvation of believers; otherwise ye will not be able to preach the word wisely."
"But mother," he said, "I dinna want to be a minister; I wad rather gang and push my fortune, as men did lang syne , that I may win gold and jewels wi' a sword in my hand, and gie them to you when I hae done."
(Vol. 1,p. 94-95)
"Mother," said Morison, returning her caress, "wherever I moved, and whatever I did, you were present: a thousand and a thousand times have I recalled your tenderness, and a thousand times lived over again the blessed hours which we have spent solitary together, in this little chamber; and, O! many a time have I recalled your affectionate predictions of the eminence I should reach but little did ye dream it was to be by the sword."
" 'Deed that's true, my bairn ," said Mary, "but the will of God maun be obeyed. The violence which reft thee from thy native land, in a great measure shaped thy calling and turned thee to this course of blood -- but ye will bide with me now, my bairn ; there are many ways to fame in thy ain land, for O, I like ill that ye are a blood-spiller, and warse , that ye are striving heart and hand wi' thae wearyfou French."
" Wi' the French, gude guide us!" exclaimed Jeanie Rabson, "is that true, Morison, and whether are ye fighting for us or against us ?"
(Vol. 3,p. 2)
Extract #3 dialect features: Codeswitch, Orthographical Respelling, Vocabulary
"Tell me boy," he said aloud, "do you know the Elfin-cave, with the little spring well in the corner, and garlands of honeysuckle hung at the entrance?"
"Oh yes! I go there once a-year with my mother; -- it is in the autumn season: she grows sad and seems ill about something; but after she has sat a while looking at one place of the cavern and praying in another, and muttering the name of some one; she grows more composed, and returns home. She will tell me, she says, the story of the cavern, some time. I am glad that she refuses to tell me now."
"Why so?" inquired the stranger.
"Because," said Morison, "I am but a boy, and there may be some wrong to right. But I maun go home, for Jeanie Rabson, of Howehoddom will be there, and I maun see her; for she is like anither mither to me. "
(Vol. 1,p. 134)
"You talk not now, Rose, like one of the discreet maidens," said Morison, "has not my follower brought home a sample of eastern lore, which has confounded my old preceptor; Davie has drank at real Egyptian and Coslo-Syrian springs; the Dominie has tasted of the fountain after being shaken and muddied in the carriage. I have no doubt he has come to consult me in this learned matter." " 'Deed have I no ," said the Dominie briskly, "I hae encountered and dumbfoundered Davie; he came upon me when I was ensconced in my wonted Saturday-at- e'en -chair at Howeboddom, and had the presumption to challenge me afore Miss Jeanie Rabson and James her brother, anent the true pronunciation of the Hebrew and the Syriac. I maun do the lad the justice to say, that as far as sound wad gang , he gaured it do, and hurled against me battalion after battalion of strange words, that were na words ava , but matters of man's invention it is enough that he couldna stand against the true thing; he was unable to resist the quotations from the fathers with which my memory is stored ; and so he broke and ran, and took owre the hill to Fourmerkland -- the gilded will pass for the solid there: his counterfeit Syriac will be current with the heiress of Fourmerkland -- she cannot detect the thing by the faith that is in her, like our ain Miss Jeanie Rabson "
(Vol. 3,p. 322-3)
"Whew!" cried Davie, " wha 's dull o' the uptauk , now; did ye no ken our auld kindly cut-throat friend Dick Corsbane!"
"By heaven!" exclaimed Morison, "you are right! I thought I knew his eye: but the long beard and wild dress baffled my examination."
" That's because," said Davie, " ye ay spoke in yere grand Dominie Milligan kind of English; wi' a mouthfu' of cannie Galloway Scotch I gat at the man's heart: but though I jaloused him, I never could make him out fully, till he gae me ane o' his gallows glowres just as he spurred awa : my een's no returned to their proper diameter yet."
(Vol. 3,p. 219)
Speaker #6:John Milligan - Preacher
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Dominie
Gender:Male
Age:Adult - middle aged
Narrative Voice:1st person
Role:Significant

Social Role
Social Role Description:Preacher
Social Role Category:Clergy
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast of Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
" Dinna ," said Jeanie Rabson, "lay yere cheek to mine Dominie -- daft bodie , I am no bonnie Mattie Anderson, nor are ye Morison Roldan."
" Aweel ," said the Dominie, sitting more perpendicular, "I concur in the motion of sending the young man to college. By the time the sickle is next among the corn, he will be put as far as my humble knowledge can put him, and then he maun go to the city of Edinburgh, and drink at the classic wells of that noble place; look out for some earl's son, who desires to learn his lesson through another men's capacities, and if he is judicious, and disna fa' in love with ane of his noble scholar's sisters, he may be ablins presented to a kirk , and the dreams of his mother realized."
"And how is he to be provided for at the college, Dominie?" said Jeanie; "how mickle siller will it take, and aboon a' will it no be a risk? -- He's young and he's handsome, with a wild ee , and wit at will; and then they say that the bonniest lasses in the wild world are to be seen in Enbrugh . -- I doubt him, Dominie, I doubt him."
(Vol. 1,p. 154)
" Now , Maister John," said Jeanie, "I see ye scarcely ken that boy; it's Morison Roldan; I love him like a drap of my ain blude , and he's the son of mickle sorrow, and I maun say't shame, for his mither was, aye , and is, bonnie Mary Morison, and his father -- I winna gie him the name he deserves but the ane he gets, Lord Roldan."
" Aye , a papist, and a malignant," said the Dominie, "a wicked witty man, and of a bold race, and bloody."
" Weel then," said Jeanie, " there's the greater need to mind this boy, for he is a Roldan every inch of him. Now ye maun keep the boys frae nicknaming him, first for his ain sake, and secondly, for theirs, for he's like a flaff of fire and thunder at the back on't , I trow he'll sort them; there'll be bloody noses amang them as sure as ye are John Milligan, and I am Jean Rabson."
(Vol. 1,p. 108)
"You talk not now, Rose, like one of the discreet maidens," said Morison, "has not my follower brought home a sample of eastern lore, which has confounded my old preceptor; Davie has drank at real Egyptian and Coslo-Syrian springs; the Dominie has tasted of the fountain after being shaken and muddied in the carriage. I have no doubt he has come to consult me in this learned matter." " 'Deed have I no ," said the Dominie briskly, "I hae encountered and dumbfoundered Davie; he came upon me when I was ensconced in my wonted Saturday-at- e'en -chair at Howeboddom, and had the presumption to challenge me afore Miss Jeanie Rabson and James her brother, anent the true pronunciation of the Hebrew and the Syriac. I maun do the lad the justice to say, that as far as sound wad gang , he gaured it do, and hurled against me battalion after battalion of strange words, that were na words ava , but matters of man's invention it is enough that he couldna stand against the true thing; he was unable to resist the quotations from the fathers with which my memory is stored ; and so he broke and ran, and took owre the hill to Fourmerkland -- the gilded will pass for the solid there: his counterfeit Syriac will be current with the heiress of Fourmerkland -- she cannot detect the thing by the faith that is in her, like our ain Miss Jeanie Rabson "
(Vol. 3,p. 322-3)
Speaker #7:Davie Gellock - Peasant
Individual or Group:Individual
Primary Identity:Davie
Gender:Male
Age:Youth
Narrative Voice:3rd person
Role:Significant

Social Role
Social Role Description:Peasant
Social Role Category:Respectable poor
Speaker's Origin
Place of Origin Description:Glengarnock, West Coast Scotland
Place of Origin Category:Glengarnock, Galloway, South Scotland, Scotland
"Whew!" cried Davie, " wha 's dull o' the uptauk , now; did ye no ken our auld kindly cut-throat friend Dick Corsbane!"
"By heaven!" exclaimed Morison, "you are right! I thought I knew his eye: but the long beard and wild dress baffled my examination."
" That's because," said Davie, " ye ay spoke in yere grand Dominie Milligan kind of English; wi' a mouthfu' of cannie Galloway Scotch I gat at the man's heart: but though I jaloused him, I never could make him out fully, till he gae me ane o' his gallows glowres just as he spurred awa : my een's no returned to their proper diameter yet."
(Vol. 3,p. 219)
"There, now!" exclaimed Davie, " that's the glance that pleases me ane half jest and half earnest; I see we'll understand ane another in time. But I'm saying, how stands matters between you and the Dominie? he had ance the advantage owre me whilk learning gies , and I aye fand myself sinking in your esteem when he spake in Latin or in Greek. But now I can bell the cat wi' him ."
"Have ye grown very learned, David?" said the heiress, "since we met last."
"Try me!" exclaimed the other; "I have been in the land of Egypt and handled the very bricks whilk the Hebrews made without straw and by means of a miracle; and I drank out o' the well of Marah, it was dooms bitter! Ou, learned! I'm sae learned that I hae some thoughts o' finishing the Dominie's sticket sermon on the Pomegranate."
(Vol. 3,p. 287-288)
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Version 1.1 (December 2015)Background image reproduced from the Database of Mid Victorian Illustration (DMVI)